I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

I originally posted this for WIT Month a few months ago but wanted to repost today. Unfortunately, this is my only memoir by an indigenous author. I do plan to read “Strong Medicine” Speaks, which is a narrative that has been in my TBR for far too long. I also need to find some more to read when I’m done with it. I’m fairly good … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

The Lake by Banana Yoshimoto, translated by Michael Emmerich

Review: The Lake was much more enjoyable than I thought it would be. I didn’t really know what to expect. As usual, I read the description when I first chose to put the book on my TBR and didn’t bother looking at it again when I sat down to read it. What’s the point, I already knew I was interested. I have to say that … Continue reading The Lake by Banana Yoshimoto, translated by Michael Emmerich

TTT: Classics by Women in Translation

It’s Top Ten Tuesday! This is a weekly meme put on by the Broke and Bookish where they give a topic and book bloggers post their top ten choices on it. This week’s topic is: August 29: Ten Hidden Gem Books in X Genre: Pick a genre and share with us some books that have gone under the radar in that genre! I’m going a … Continue reading TTT: Classics by Women in Translation

My Invented Country: A Nostalgic Journey Through Chile by Isabel Allende, translated by Margaret Sayers Peden

Review:    My Invented Country is a different kind of memoir. Allende’s personal memoir was Paula, but as it says in the title, this one is about Chile. Don’t confuse it with a history of Chile either. This is written in a memoir style and is simply Allende’s experience of her country. It’s the way she remembers things and the way she remembers feeling things. There is … Continue reading My Invented Country: A Nostalgic Journey Through Chile by Isabel Allende, translated by Margaret Sayers Peden

Who is celebrating WIT Month?

This yearly event has been going on for about four years, according to its creator on Biblibio. I especially loved her recent WITMonth post to Rethink PC. I have this problem with people too. Check out her post, its’ brilliant. Here are some bloggers celebrating WIT Month this year! Biblibio: WITMonth Day 1 The Book Satchel: 13 Books by Women Writers to add to your 2017 Reading … Continue reading Who is celebrating WIT Month?

Sultana’s Dream by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, translated by Roushan Jahan

Review:  Sultana’s Dream is actually a short story and not a whole book, which I didn’t realize until it came to an abrupt end. It’s about a woman’s dream of an utopian society of women who took over the running of their from the men after they suffered a massive military defeat. The story of how the women came to power is my favorite part of … Continue reading Sultana’s Dream by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, translated by Roushan Jahan

TTT: Top Ten book recommendations for WIT Month!

It’s been forever since I’ve done a Top Ten Tuesday, but I have missed them. In case you aren’t familiar with this weekly meme, Top Ten Tuesday is put on by the Broke and the Bookish. They put out a list of topics by Tuesdays and lots of book bloggers join in the fun, linking their posts book to the originator of the meme. Today’s … Continue reading TTT: Top Ten book recommendations for WIT Month!

I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Review:  I, Rigoberta Menchu is listed as a “testimonial biography”, biography, and a memoir. Elisabeth Burgos-Debray, who wrote it down for her, calls it a narrative. Menchu narrated her story for Burgos and it is written in the first person. I had read another narrative by an activist when I was writing my old blog, it was The Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Since it’s consistently listed as … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Things We Lost in the Fire by Mariana Enríquez, translated by Megan McDowell

Review:  This is an amazing collection of short stories. Normally, I don’t read horror but the title is so compelling. I just had to read the whole book as soon as I read the title. It is super creepy. Like, really really creepy. Creeped out at a level that I haven’t been since the last time I read a Stephen King collection of short stories. … Continue reading Things We Lost in the Fire by Mariana Enríquez, translated by Megan McDowell