I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

I originally posted this for WIT Month a few months ago but wanted to repost today. Unfortunately, this is my only memoir by an indigenous author. I do plan to read "Strong Medicine" Speaks, which is a narrative that has been in my TBR for far too long. I also need to find some more … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

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WIT Month Wrap Up

My second Women In Translation Month has come to a close. It's a little bitter sweet. I know I can continue to read women in translation throughout the year, have definitely upped my regular reading of them, and have challenges to finish, but it's still nice to have a theme for a while and focus … Continue reading WIT Month Wrap Up

The Lake by Banana Yoshimoto, translated by Michael Emmerich

Review: The Lake was much more enjoyable than I thought it would be. I didn't really know what to expect. As usual, I read the description when I first chose to put the book on my TBR and didn't bother looking at it again when I sat down to read it. What's the point, I … Continue reading The Lake by Banana Yoshimoto, translated by Michael Emmerich

TTT: Classics by Women in Translation

It's Top Ten Tuesday! This is a weekly meme put on by the Broke and Bookish where they give a topic and book bloggers post their top ten choices on it. This week's topic is: August 29: Ten Hidden Gem Books in X Genre: Pick a genre and share with us some books that have … Continue reading TTT: Classics by Women in Translation

My Invented Country: A Nostalgic Journey Through Chile by Isabel Allende, translated by Margaret Sayers Peden

Review:    My Invented Country is a different kind of memoir. Allende's personal memoir was Paula, but as it says in the title, this one is about Chile. Don't confuse it with a history of Chile either. This is written in a memoir style and is simply Allende's experience of her country. It's the way she remembers … Continue reading My Invented Country: A Nostalgic Journey Through Chile by Isabel Allende, translated by Margaret Sayers Peden

Who is celebrating WIT Month?

This yearly event has been going on for about four years, according to its creator on Biblibio. I especially loved her recent WITMonth post to Rethink PC. I have this problem with people too. Check out her post, its' brilliant. Here are some bloggers celebrating WIT Month this year! Biblibio: WITMonth Day 1 The Book Satchel: 13 … Continue reading Who is celebrating WIT Month?

Sultana’s Dream by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, translated by Roushan Jahan

Review:  Sultana's Dream is actually a short story and not a whole book, which I didn't realize until it came to an abrupt end. It's about a woman's dream of an utopian society of women who took over the running of their from the men after they suffered a massive military defeat. The story of how … Continue reading Sultana’s Dream by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, translated by Roushan Jahan

I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Review:  I, Rigoberta Menchu is listed as a "testimonial biography", biography, and a memoir. Elisabeth Burgos-Debray, who wrote it down for her, calls it a narrative. Menchu narrated her story for Burgos and it is written in the first person. I had read another narrative by an activist when I was writing my old blog, it … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Memoir Monday: The Girl from the Metropol Hotel by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya

As I was searching form my WIT Month reads, I came upon this book. It didn't quite make it into my TBR for this month but it is in a more long term one. Here's the synopsis: The prizewinning memoir of one of the world’s great writers, about coming of age as an enemy of the … Continue reading Memoir Monday: The Girl from the Metropol Hotel by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya

Femme Friday: Translated Poets

Translation is never easy but I have a feeling that translating poetry is even more difficult than normal. There is the cadence of the poem and all the hidden meanings behind word usage to consider. I don't envy a translator in general, but it must take a special kind of professional to throw themselves into … Continue reading Femme Friday: Translated Poets