Reblog: Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

I absolutely loved this memoir written in poetry when I had first read it and wanted to remind everyone of it for this year's National Poetry Month! I don't know what you're reading this April but I highly recommend brown girl dreaming if you haven't read it yet! Review: I've read a lot of memoirs, but … Continue reading Reblog: Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

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Memoir Monday: Something Fierce

I read this memoir about this time last year. Surprisingly, it was the only memoir or biography of a Hispanic woman I'd read until last month. I recently finished My Invented Country  by Isabel Allende, (translated by Margaret Sayers Peden) for WIT Month. Coincidentally, Allende and Aguirre are both from Chile and both fled the regime … Continue reading Memoir Monday: Something Fierce

The Turtle of Oman by Naomi Shihab Nye

Review: Way, way back in April, I posted about some books that had been one of the 2015 awardees of the Arab American book awards. Check out the post here. I've since added a bunch of them to my TBR and this was one. Here's an excerpt from the back cover: Aref does not want … Continue reading The Turtle of Oman by Naomi Shihab Nye

In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey to Freedom by Yeonmi Park

 Review: I've read (listened to) a lot of memoirs in recent years but this was my first by a human trafficking survivor. It's a powerful story of survival and determination that all adults should read. I'll warn the potential reader, though, this book comes riddled with triggers. An excerpt from the back cover: Yeonmi Park … Continue reading In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey to Freedom by Yeonmi Park

A Torch Against the Night by Sabaa Tahir

Review: This is the second book of Tahir's series, An Ember in the Ashes. I read and reviewed the first one here. I loved it and looked forward to this sequel. It did not disappoint.  If you haven't read the first book, stop here. Here's the back cover: After the events of the Fourth Trial, Martial soldiers hunt … Continue reading A Torch Against the Night by Sabaa Tahir

Something Fierce: Memoirs of a Revolutionary Daughter by Carmen Aguirre

Review: I love a good memoir, especially one that comes from such an unusual history. Here's the back cover info: The winner of CBC's Canada Reads 2012, Something Fierce by Carmen Aguirre, re-issued by Vintage Canada. Six-year-old Carmen Aguirre fled to Canada with her family following General Augusto Pinochet's violent 1973 coup in Chile. Five … Continue reading Something Fierce: Memoirs of a Revolutionary Daughter by Carmen Aguirre

An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

Review: I'd heard a lot of hype around this book and it did not disappoint. I have to admit, I wasn't entirely prepared for this book. I had read some reviews back when I first put it on my TBR and I went on hold at the library. That was months ago. All I remembered about … Continue reading An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

The Girl Who Wrote Loneliness by Kyung-Sook Shin, translated by Ha-Yun Jung

Review: It's not very often that a work of fiction gets to me as much as this one did. It was beautiful and haunting and familiar and foreign all at the same time. Homesick and alone, a teenage girl has just arrived in Seoul to work in a factory. Her family, still in the countryside, is … Continue reading The Girl Who Wrote Loneliness by Kyung-Sook Shin, translated by Ha-Yun Jung

Monstress #4-6 by Marjorie M. Liu and Sana Takeda

Review:  As always, the art in these are just amazing. It's not overly-stylized. I feel like it's not really stylized at all, but just depicts people as they look. The characters are beautiful, but I feel like it's part of their world that the women in these high power positions have the means to make … Continue reading Monstress #4-6 by Marjorie M. Liu and Sana Takeda

About the Night by Anat Talshir, translated by Evan Fallenberg

Review: The setting as a big part of what I loved about the story. People try to do stories of this kind in made-up scenarios and though some work, using the events that transpired in Jerusalem in the middle of the last century is just genius. There were so many things that I never quite … Continue reading About the Night by Anat Talshir, translated by Evan Fallenberg