The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State by Nadia Murad

Review: I've had The Last Girl on my TBR ever since Scribd started advertising it a while back but the subject matter was a little much for me at the time. I know these things happen and there are all kinds of terrible things happening to women all over the world and it can all seem … Continue reading The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State by Nadia Murad

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New Nobel Women

This year we have 3 new Nobel Women! Our new Nobel Laureates are: Donna Strickland Frances Arnold Nadia Murad - Nobel Peace Prize - The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State Unfortunately, only one has a memoir or biography, which I just read and will post a review of on Monday. … Continue reading New Nobel Women

Pavilion of Women by Pearl Buck

Review:  This is my first Pearl Buck novel, but certainly won't be my last. She is one of the Nobel laureates in literature and this title was irresistible. I had originally planned to read The Good Earth because it would also fit into this year's Read Harder challenge since it was a part Oprah's Book Club … Continue reading Pavilion of Women by Pearl Buck

Unbowed by Wangari Maathai

Review: I picked up Unbowed for my Nobel Women challenge. It turns out that, like all of the women who have won the Nobel Prize in Peace, Maathai's story is beyond incredible. Don't get me wrong, all people given such honors are likely to have been through hardship, but it gets me each time in a new … Continue reading Unbowed by Wangari Maathai

I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

I originally posted this for WIT Month a few months ago but wanted to repost today. Unfortunately, this is my only memoir by an indigenous author. I do plan to read "Strong Medicine" Speaks, which is a narrative that has been in my TBR for far too long. I also need to find some more … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Voices from Chernobyl by by Svetlana Alexievich, translated by Keith Gessen

Review: Voices from Chernobyl is one of my Reading Nobel Women. Alexievich won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature for books like this one. She is a master at writing the Soviet experience from the "perspective of the individual". I definitely want to read the rest of her books after this. The book is a compilation of interviews … Continue reading Voices from Chernobyl by by Svetlana Alexievich, translated by Keith Gessen

Memoir Monday: Nobel Women TBR

As mentioned last week, I still have quite a few books from Nobel Women to read and at least two are memoirs. Here they are: Born in a rural village in 1940, Wangari Maathai was already an iconoclast as a child, determined to get an education even though most girls were uneducated. We see her … Continue reading Memoir Monday: Nobel Women TBR

Memoir Monday: Nobel Women Read

Today begins announcements for the 2017 Nobel Prizes! Last year, I decided to read at least one book by every woman who had been awarded the Nobel Prize. I had initially wanted to do it in a year but that reading schedule proved a little too daunting. Instead, I've sprinkled them in with other challenges. … Continue reading Memoir Monday: Nobel Women Read

I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Review:  I, Rigoberta Menchu is listed as a "testimonial biography", biography, and a memoir. Elisabeth Burgos-Debray, who wrote it down for her, calls it a narrative. Menchu narrated her story for Burgos and it is written in the first person. I had read another narrative by an activist when I was writing my old blog, it … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Femme Friday: Translated Poets

Translation is never easy but I have a feeling that translating poetry is even more difficult than normal. There is the cadence of the poem and all the hidden meanings behind word usage to consider. I don't envy a translator in general, but it must take a special kind of professional to throw themselves into … Continue reading Femme Friday: Translated Poets