Unbowed by Wangari Maathai

Review: I picked up Unbowed for my Nobel Women challenge. It turns out that, like all of the women who have won the Nobel Prize in Peace, Maathai’s story is beyond incredible. Don’t get me wrong, all people given such honors are likely to have been through hardship, but it gets me each time in a new way. I love Maathai’s idea to build the Greenbelt Movement. … Continue reading Unbowed by Wangari Maathai

I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

I originally posted this for WIT Month a few months ago but wanted to repost today. Unfortunately, this is my only memoir by an indigenous author. I do plan to read “Strong Medicine” Speaks, which is a narrative that has been in my TBR for far too long. I also need to find some more to read when I’m done with it. I’m fairly good … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Voices from Chernobyl by by Svetlana Alexievich, translated by Keith Gessen

Review: Voices from Chernobyl is one of my Reading Nobel Women. Alexievich won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature for books like this one. She is a master at writing the Soviet experience from the “perspective of the individual”. I definitely want to read the rest of her books after this. The book is a compilation of interviews that she does with witnesses to the events at Chernobyl … Continue reading Voices from Chernobyl by by Svetlana Alexievich, translated by Keith Gessen

Memoir Monday: Nobel Women TBR

As mentioned last week, I still have quite a few books from Nobel Women to read and at least two are memoirs. Here they are: Born in a rural village in 1940, Wangari Maathai was already an iconoclast as a child, determined to get an education even though most girls were uneducated. We see her studying with Catholic missionaries, earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees in … Continue reading Memoir Monday: Nobel Women TBR

Memoir Monday: Nobel Women Read

Today begins announcements for the 2017 Nobel Prizes! Last year, I decided to read at least one book by every woman who had been awarded the Nobel Prize. I had initially wanted to do it in a year but that reading schedule proved a little too daunting. Instead, I’ve sprinkled them in with other challenges. Also, not all have written a book so I have … Continue reading Memoir Monday: Nobel Women Read

I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Review:  I, Rigoberta Menchu is listed as a “testimonial biography”, biography, and a memoir. Elisabeth Burgos-Debray, who wrote it down for her, calls it a narrative. Menchu narrated her story for Burgos and it is written in the first person. I had read another narrative by an activist when I was writing my old blog, it was The Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Since it’s consistently listed as … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Femme Friday: Translated Poets

Translation is never easy but I have a feeling that translating poetry is even more difficult than normal. There is the cadence of the poem and all the hidden meanings behind word usage to consider. I don’t envy a translator in general, but it must take a special kind of professional to throw themselves into the poetry of another language and try to come out … Continue reading Femme Friday: Translated Poets

Welcome to Women in Translation Month!

Women in Translation Month has been gaining traction over the last few years and with good reason. It may be easy to pretend that the only writers to worry about are those who write in your own language, you would be sadly mistaken. Some of our best literature and most revamped adaptations have come from other countries, most notably the amazing history of French classics … Continue reading Welcome to Women in Translation Month!

This Child Will Be Great: Memoir of a Remarkable Life by Africa’s First Woman President by Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

Review: President Sirleaf is one of the Nobel Prize winning women that I challenged myself to read last October. I had first heard her name in the memoir of one of her co-winners, Leymah Gbowee, that I had reviewed here for the blog I had before this one. Because of that, I was a little familiar with the civil wars that tore Liberia apart for … Continue reading This Child Will Be Great: Memoir of a Remarkable Life by Africa’s First Woman President by Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer by Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn and Dr. Elissa Epel

Review: Most of the guidance on living better wasn’t new, but the science behind it was new for me and incredibly interesting. It made so much more sense of the standard lifestyle and health advice that I have felt a little bombarded by at times. Have you wondered why some sixty-year-olds look and feel like forty-year-olds and why some forty-year-olds look and feel like sixty-year-olds? … Continue reading The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer by Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn and Dr. Elissa Epel