I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Review:  I, Rigoberta Menchu is listed as a “testimonial biography”, biography, and a memoir. Elisabeth Burgos-Debray, who wrote it down for her, calls it a narrative. Menchu narrated her story for Burgos and it is written in the first person. I had read another narrative by an activist when I was writing my old blog, it was The Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Since it’s consistently listed as … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Femme Friday: Translated Poets

Translation is never easy but I have a feeling that translating poetry is even more difficult than normal. There is the cadence of the poem and all the hidden meanings behind word usage to consider. I don’t envy a translator in general, but it must take a special kind of professional to throw themselves into the poetry of another language and try to come out … Continue reading Femme Friday: Translated Poets

Welcome to Women in Translation Month!

Women in Translation Month has been gaining traction over the last few years and with good reason. It may be easy to pretend that the only writers to worry about are those who write in your own language, you would be sadly mistaken. Some of our best literature and most revamped adaptations have come from other countries, most notably the amazing history of French classics … Continue reading Welcome to Women in Translation Month!

This Child Will Be Great: Memoir of a Remarkable Life by Africa’s First Woman President by Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

Review: President Sirleaf is one of the Nobel Prize winning women that I challenged myself to read last October. I had first heard her name in the memoir of one of her co-winners, Leymah Gbowee, that I had reviewed here for the blog I had before this one. Because of that, I was a little familiar with the civil wars that tore Liberia apart for … Continue reading This Child Will Be Great: Memoir of a Remarkable Life by Africa’s First Woman President by Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer by Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn and Dr. Elissa Epel

Review: Most of the guidance on living better wasn’t new, but the science behind it was new for me and incredibly interesting. It made so much more sense of the standard lifestyle and health advice that I have felt a little bombarded by at times. Have you wondered why some sixty-year-olds look and feel like forty-year-olds and why some forty-year-olds look and feel like sixty-year-olds? … Continue reading The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer by Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn and Dr. Elissa Epel

Map: Collected and Last Poems by Wisława Szymborska, translated by Clare Cavanagh and Stanisław Barańczak

Review: This is one of my Reading Nobel Women books, a complete collection of Wislawa Szymborska’s work, and it was amazing. A new collected volume from the Nobel Prize–winning poet that includes, for the first time in English, all of the poems from her last Polish collection One of Europe’s greatest recent poets is also its wisest, wittiest, and most accessible. Nobel Prize–winner Wislawa Szymborska … Continue reading Map: Collected and Last Poems by Wisława Szymborska, translated by Clare Cavanagh and Stanisław Barańczak

Madwomen: The “Locas mujeres” Poems of Gabriela Mistral, a Bilingual Edition

Review: Between the concept of the collection, that this is the bilingual edition, and that it has a short biography of the author, it’s kind of a one stop shop for this great poet. Showcasing women who are at the edges of their ability to cope and in a variety of situations, this collection is also surprisingly relatable. A schoolteacher whose poetry catapulted her to … Continue reading Madwomen: The “Locas mujeres” Poems of Gabriela Mistral, a Bilingual Edition

Burger’s Daughter by Nadine Gordimer

Review: My first book finished for the year is for my personal Reading Nobel Women challenge. This was my choice for Nadine Gordimer who is a recipient for Literature, so I read one of her novels. This is the moving story of the unforgettable Rosa Burger, a young woman from South Africa cast in the mold of a revolutionary tradition. Rosa tries to uphold her … Continue reading Burger’s Daughter by Nadine Gordimer

My stream of consciousness inspired by Aung San Suu Kyi’s Freedom from Fear

I reviewed this book earlier today here. It brought about lots of feelings and thoughts and ideas and I need to get them all out here, so here we go. Despite that we are not under a military government, there is fear and concern and violence going around in the US right now and much of it comes from the way in which our democracy does … Continue reading My stream of consciousness inspired by Aung San Suu Kyi’s Freedom from Fear

Freedom From Fear and Other Writings by Aung San Suu Kyi, edited by Michael Aris

Review:  Oh, the feels. There’s just too much here and during this time. I’m trying to keep this to a review and will post the book inspired rant later. Please bear with me, there will be crossover. This book is amazing and really showcases the struggle and strength of a founder of democracy for her country. This is one of my Reading Nobel Women books. … Continue reading Freedom From Fear and Other Writings by Aung San Suu Kyi, edited by Michael Aris