Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

Review: Honestly, I enjoyed a lot of this book but not everything. It makes a statement about what it means to emigrate to the US and elaborates on so many of the little things that aren’t always obvious. It shows the dream and a few ways that people try to make it a reality. It also doesn’t pull any punches. I know it’s part of … Continue reading Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

Silent Spring by Rachel Carson

Review: I am so glad I was born well after Silent Spring was written and listened to. I got to grow up with the knowledge of the overarching theme of this book and the benefits that came from it. While there are still poisonous pesticides and fertilizers in use out there today, they are far fewer in prevalence than it sounds like back then and I … Continue reading Silent Spring by Rachel Carson

The Power by Naomi Alderman

Review: There is just so much to love about this book. First of all, let me note that I am not one for the reversal of power in the world and that a reversal of power is not the feminist end game. However, The Power does perfectly show everything that continues to be wrong with this world as it reverses the power dynamic at play in the … Continue reading The Power by Naomi Alderman

Six-Gun Snow White by Catherynne M. Valente

Review:   I forgot how much I love Catherynne Valente’s style. I get that I could have chosen a book that was a little more in the spirit of the Read Harder task #7 but this was irresistible. I’m pretty sure I’ve mentioned before that I have a weakness for fairy tale retellings. I’ll pretty much read any retelling in almost any form. I had loved … Continue reading Six-Gun Snow White by Catherynne M. Valente

Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige

Review: Dorothy Must Die was just what I needed. My reviews don’t come out in exactly the same order as my reading and I had just gone through some pretty heavy material and needed the break. This was everything I hoped it would be. I’m a sucker for revisiting a world I know and I do love new interpretations of those worlds and enjoy what … Continue reading Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige

milk and honey by rupi kaur

Review:  I was never one for poetry in school but I’m learning that this has had much more to do with the sanitized selections my school made than poetry itself. This particular book of poetry has triggers for rape and sexual assault and I would say domestic abuse as well. Its also perfect for a single sitting read for anyone doing the Read Harder challenge … Continue reading milk and honey by rupi kaur

The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

Review:  I have to admit that I didn’t really get this one. I love Roy’s style and enjoyed the book, but I’m not entirely certain I understood it. I think it would make a great book club book for discussion and perspectives because there is so much to digest here. Maybe it’ll end up as one of those books that I only get in retrospect, … Continue reading The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

Relish: My Life in the Kitchen by Lucy Knisley

Review:   After reading Relish, I just want to sit with Knisley and gush about all our favorite foods. I don’t have quite the educated palate, but it’s one of my favorite topics. Knisley includes a recipe at the end of every chapter of a food she talks about throughout the chapter too and I am definitely going to try them all! Okay, not the pickles. I’m … Continue reading Relish: My Life in the Kitchen by Lucy Knisley

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Review: I look forward to the day when this book has been added to American Literature classes all over the country. It beautifully captures so much of our history and the alternatives that life could have taken. Homegoing focuses on the African and slave experiences but I’m sure many Americans of all races can look back and see a dividing point when their families decided to … Continue reading Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

Review:  I have to admit that the title is what initially caught my attention, as I’m sure it was intended to do. The New Jim Crow presents a compelling case for how the war on drugs, among others things, has created an undercaste in the United States. It sounds a little crazy at first but when you stop and think about it, if you’ve ever had … Continue reading The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander