I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

I originally posted this for WIT Month a few months ago but wanted to repost today. Unfortunately, this is my only memoir by an indigenous author. I do plan to read “Strong Medicine” Speaks, which is a narrative that has been in my TBR for far too long. I also need to find some more to read when I’m done with it. I’m fairly good … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

Review:  I, Rigoberta Menchu is listed as a “testimonial biography”, biography, and a memoir. Elisabeth Burgos-Debray, who wrote it down for her, calls it a narrative. Menchu narrated her story for Burgos and it is written in the first person. I had read another narrative by an activist when I was writing my old blog, it was The Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Since it’s consistently listed as … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Review: It’s amazing how hearing the same story from a different perspective makes you see it all a little differently. While there are some bits that I’m not familiar with from American history classes throughout the years, most of the information isn’t entirely new. This book just does something with the information that no American history class I’ve ever taken has done. It added in … Continue reading An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

FF- International Day to End Violence Against Women

This year’s International Day to End Violence Against Women happens to fall on a Friday, so that makes it the perfect Femme Friday topic. These are some books that can help get someone sped up on the history of violence against women. While men do perpetrate violence against each other as well, this day is meant to bring awareness to the fact that there are … Continue reading FF- International Day to End Violence Against Women

Freedom From Fear and Other Writings by Aung San Suu Kyi, edited by Michael Aris

Review:  Oh, the feels. There’s just too much here and during this time. I’m trying to keep this to a review and will post the book inspired rant later. Please bear with me, there will be crossover. This book is amazing and really showcases the struggle and strength of a founder of democracy for her country. This is one of my Reading Nobel Women books. … Continue reading Freedom From Fear and Other Writings by Aung San Suu Kyi, edited by Michael Aris

In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey to Freedom by Yeonmi Park

 Review: I’ve read (listened to) a lot of memoirs in recent years but this was my first by a human trafficking survivor. It’s a powerful story of survival and determination that all adults should read. I’ll warn the potential reader, though, this book comes riddled with triggers. An excerpt from the back cover: Yeonmi Park has told the harrowing story of her escape from North … Continue reading In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey to Freedom by Yeonmi Park

Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight Against Fundamentalism by Karima Bennoune

Review: This book is a needed reminder that the people who live under the rule of fundamentalists don’t get near the support they need. They are the first line of defense against fundamentalism, the first people who suffer on account of it and the last to be freed from its horrors. These are the people this book is about. It is their fight and their struggle … Continue reading Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight Against Fundamentalism by Karima Bennoune

Quote of the Week – from Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here by Karima Bennoune

There have been public gatherings condemning the violence in Lahore since my visit as well. At least six hundred “members of civil rights organizations, singers and students” attended a candlelight vigil at the Liberty Roundabout and a rally at the Press Club in May 2012 after militant attacks on mosques belonging to the minority Ahmadi sect killed ninety-five.3 Everyone in the United States who watches … Continue reading Quote of the Week – from Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here by Karima Bennoune

Quote of the Week – from Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here by Karima Bennoune

 In fact, the two Far Rights—the Western one and the Muslim one—play off each other. As Jeanne Favret-Saada wrote in the wake of the Innocence of Muslims conflagration, “On one side we have cowardly networks of so-called defenders of the West who manufacture a provocation . . . and make terroristic use of freedom of expression, and on the other side Muslim fundamentalist commandoes . … Continue reading Quote of the Week – from Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here by Karima Bennoune

Femme Friday – Women who tell another story

In the immortal words of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: When we remember that there is never a single story about any place, we regain a kind of paradise. With this in mind, I wanted to share the authors who’s books brought to me another story, another version of a place that I didn’t know about. Humaira Awais Shahid, author of Devotion and Defiance: My Fight for Justice … Continue reading Femme Friday – Women who tell another story