Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson

Review:  I read Furiously Happy a while back and LOVED it, so I had to go out and get this one (well, from the library) as soon as I was caught up on my reading challenges. I’d had no idea this one came first and I’m looking forward to checking out her third book this year too. As before, Lawson’s writing style is rambling and fun … Continue reading Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson

Unbowed by Wangari Maathai

Review: I picked up Unbowed for my Nobel Women challenge. It turns out that, like all of the women who have won the Nobel Prize in Peace, Maathai’s story is beyond incredible. Don’t get me wrong, all people given such honors are likely to have been through hardship, but it gets me each time in a new way. I love Maathai’s idea to build the Greenbelt Movement. … Continue reading Unbowed by Wangari Maathai

Colonize This!: Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism edited by Daisy Hernandez and Bushra Rehman

Review: First of all, let me just point out that where the title says “Today’s Feminism” they are not actually talking about today. They are talking about 2002, when it was originally published. I had originally thought it was a recent book, mostly because I wasn’t paying adequate attention to it and had fallen absolutely in love with the title. So, this is very much … Continue reading Colonize This!: Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism edited by Daisy Hernandez and Bushra Rehman

I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

I originally posted this for WIT Month a few months ago but wanted to repost today. Unfortunately, this is my only memoir by an indigenous author. I do plan to read “Strong Medicine” Speaks, which is a narrative that has been in my TBR for far too long. I also need to find some more to read when I’m done with it. I’m fairly good … Continue reading I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchú, translated by Ann Wright

The Longevity Book: The Science of Aging, the Biology of Strength, and the Privilege of Time by Cameron Diaz and Sandra Bark

Review: The Longevity Book is a great follow up to Diaz’s The Body Book. It picks up with the question of just what happens over time. The book even starts with a plea to be proud of our ages. We are taking better care of ourselves,  benefitting from medical and technological advances, and living longer than ever. We should be proud of how much life we’ve lived and … Continue reading The Longevity Book: The Science of Aging, the Biology of Strength, and the Privilege of Time by Cameron Diaz and Sandra Bark

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson

Review:  Furiously Happy might be the most entertaining book I have ever read. Lawson is ridiculously hilarious. Her rambling style of writing sounds a lot like my internal monologue on some days. Well, a less creative version with a smaller rolodex of messed up things that could happen. Its more the distances her train of thought travels before returning back to the point and less … Continue reading Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson

Glass ceilings, cliffs, and basements

Just in case anyone uncertain about these terms, these “glass” structures are the invisible, barely perceptible, seemingly immovable structures that keep people from reaching their full potential in the job market or public sector. Last year, Hillary Clinton was pushed hard off the glass cliff that is the US presidency and we ended up with our current president, despite the glaring difference between the electoral … Continue reading Glass ceilings, cliffs, and basements

Voices from Chernobyl by by Svetlana Alexievich, translated by Keith Gessen

Review: Voices from Chernobyl is one of my Reading Nobel Women. Alexievich won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature for books like this one. She is a master at writing the Soviet experience from the “perspective of the individual”. I definitely want to read the rest of her books after this. The book is a compilation of interviews that she does with witnesses to the events at Chernobyl … Continue reading Voices from Chernobyl by by Svetlana Alexievich, translated by Keith Gessen

Ordinary Light by Tracy K. Smith

Review:  This one is hard to review. Smith’s story is not bad or uninteresting or poorly written, but it just didn’t speak to me. While there were familiar elements in her story, whether to my own experience or other books I’ve already read, there was not much that made it really stand out. In the world of personal experiences, I don’t consider this a bad … Continue reading Ordinary Light by Tracy K. Smith

Free will, self determination, identity politics, and God

The idea of these four things or concepts don’t always seem to go together but between a sermon I heard the other day and knowing a little about what’s going on in my denomination of Christianity and this project to read and blog through the whole Bible, I’m feeling a little lost. I’ve been trying to talk about next steps here and there and where … Continue reading Free will, self determination, identity politics, and God